feed.angeli.ca

things i like:
rock'n'roll, country, punk & metal.
bands that combine all four successfully.
design, graphic & interior.
the intersection of philosophy & sociology.
ampersands.
andrew wk.
emergent gameplay, of the videogaming variety.
cursing.
beards.
beer.
bbq.
cjlo.
deep fried everything.
americana.
making lists
, including this one of my life's ambitions, and these of things on my mind at the time.

feedback: @angelidotca or ask me anything you'd like here.

i took a trip! read about it here.

evidence of my lame yuppie side on my (gasp!) house blog here.

I GOT A KINECT! Part III
It’s no secret that I’m enamored with the Kinect and all its capabilities. While I have yet to try it out on so called “serious” games, like Mass Effect 3 or Skyrim, I have been enjoying the experimental side of Kinect, especially in Fun Labs. 
Kinect Fun Labs is a collection of experimental mini games that unleash the power of Kinect’s cameras in unexpected ways. You can use Fun Labs to photoskin an Xbox Live avatar of yourself (creepy, trust me), to animate 3 dimensional objects around your house, and, my favorite latest discovery, to exercise the superhero powers you always knew you had. “I Am Super!” is the name of this last one, and it allows you to hurl electricity or burst your friends into flames. Ice and poison powers are also available, and equally awesome. There are quite a few other games in Fun Labs, with more being added over time.
For those who want to contribute to the Kinect’s capabilities, Voice Studios is an app to try out. You’ll find it in the “social” section of the Apps marketplace on Xbox Live, and essentially it offers up achievements and avatar rewards in exchange for improving the voice recognition capability of Kinect. While sample noise from films and games (including one of my favorites, Viva Pinata!) plays in the background, you read simple sentences and phrases, some of which hint at future Kinect abilities, and then submit them. 
As for the actual games I’ve been playing on Kinect, I only have a couple of titles: Kinect Adventures, which came with it, and which I’ve only dipped into casually, and EA Sports Active 2, which I’ve found to be a really solid fitness game that’s friendly to people at all fitness levels.
I’ve also added a couple of nifty downloadable titles to my roster today. A hat tip to Andrew Davidson over at Too Much Music for sending me some MS points, because thanks to him (and Xbox Live Rewards) I was able to grab both Fruit Ninja Kinect and Double Fine Happy Action Theatre! Both titles are on sale this week (at 30% and 50% off respectively), and both take the Kinect to a silly happy place.
Fruit Ninja Kinect will not be a foreign concept to anyone with a smartphone, I’m sure. The only difference is that here you use your arms to karate chop that fruit into submission. As for DFHAT? Well, it seems to be a variation on Kinect Fun Labs, only in a standalone title that involves lava spills, virtual ball pits and stomping on buildings like a monster movie villain. Which is to say, all things that go well with a large group of tipsy adults. I’m sure I’ll have more to share on this title once I give it a whirl, and know more about it than the demo gave away.
Missed Part I or Part II? Have no fear, just click through.
[This is an image pulled from the Kinect patent application.]

I GOT A KINECT! Part III

It’s no secret that I’m enamored with the Kinect and all its capabilities. While I have yet to try it out on so called “serious” games, like Mass Effect 3 or Skyrim, I have been enjoying the experimental side of Kinect, especially in Fun Labs. 

Kinect Fun Labs is a collection of experimental mini games that unleash the power of Kinect’s cameras in unexpected ways. You can use Fun Labs to photoskin an Xbox Live avatar of yourself (creepy, trust me), to animate 3 dimensional objects around your house, and, my favorite latest discovery, to exercise the superhero powers you always knew you had. “I Am Super!” is the name of this last one, and it allows you to hurl electricity or burst your friends into flames. Ice and poison powers are also available, and equally awesome. There are quite a few other games in Fun Labs, with more being added over time.

For those who want to contribute to the Kinect’s capabilities, Voice Studios is an app to try out. You’ll find it in the “social” section of the Apps marketplace on Xbox Live, and essentially it offers up achievements and avatar rewards in exchange for improving the voice recognition capability of Kinect. While sample noise from films and games (including one of my favorites, Viva Pinata!) plays in the background, you read simple sentences and phrases, some of which hint at future Kinect abilities, and then submit them. 

As for the actual games I’ve been playing on Kinect, I only have a couple of titles: Kinect Adventures, which came with it, and which I’ve only dipped into casually, and EA Sports Active 2, which I’ve found to be a really solid fitness game that’s friendly to people at all fitness levels.

I’ve also added a couple of nifty downloadable titles to my roster today. A hat tip to Andrew Davidson over at Too Much Music for sending me some MS points, because thanks to him (and Xbox Live Rewards) I was able to grab both Fruit Ninja Kinect and Double Fine Happy Action Theatre! Both titles are on sale this week (at 30% and 50% off respectively), and both take the Kinect to a silly happy place.

Fruit Ninja Kinect will not be a foreign concept to anyone with a smartphone, I’m sure. The only difference is that here you use your arms to karate chop that fruit into submission. As for DFHAT? Well, it seems to be a variation on Kinect Fun Labs, only in a standalone title that involves lava spills, virtual ball pits and stomping on buildings like a monster movie villain. Which is to say, all things that go well with a large group of tipsy adults. I’m sure I’ll have more to share on this title once I give it a whirl, and know more about it than the demo gave away.

Missed Part I or Part II? Have no fear, just click through.

[This is an image pulled from the Kinect patent application.]

Hey cheapskates! Remember how obsessed I am with Stacking? Well good news! You can get it, and its DLC, The Lost Hobo King, at 50% off on XBL right now (600p and 200p respectively). Also, trivia nerds will be pleased to find out that all 4 DLC add ons for You Don’t Know Jack! are also 50% off. I picked up all of them for 800 points, and given that together they add another 40 episodes to the full game’s original 73, that’s a pretty solid value.

AssRev: Sour Grapes, or How Do They Know What I Do In Private?

This past weekend meant double XP in the world of AssRev (Assassin’s Creed Revelations, for the uninitiated) multiplayer, something I took intense advantage of. I hit level 50 on Thursday night, and am more than halfway towards completing my first full Prestige level, greatly aided by the fact that my points were doubled all weekend long.

The promise of double XP lures tons of players online at all hours of the day or night, which is great. Not so great? Tons of players, which means that the usual ratio of shitty to awesome players is unusually inflated. The game mode in question is Wanted, where patience and quick wits are prized, and while I’ve come across some amazing players, whose stealth is fully admirable, many of my games have been populated by “100 pointers”. These are players who have chosen to ignore the now mandatory tutorial, and against the rules of mathematics and sense, continue to hope that running around the map at breakneck speed and stabbing their target for a paltry 100 points (or shooting them with the gun, CoD-style) will grab them enough points to win.

Now, there’s nothing that terrible about 100 pointers, in that they’re easy prey, often running right into a clever player’s blade. Bear in mind, with the new AssRev mechanics, a 100 pointer’s kill is usually a zero sum game. They run at you and stab you for 100 points, you counter with a stun, and the game gives you an “honorable death”… 100 points for him, and 100 points for you. Nonetheless, when the majority of players in the session are stealthy, high-scoring gamers playing for big points, having your kills constantly interrupted by 100 pointers is a total drag. 

This is the reason why I’ve submitted an inordinate amount of player reviews this weekend. Xbox Live allows you to avoid certain players, without having to file a complaint, simply by “tattling” on them to the system. You can avoid a player for 3 general criteria, each of which have subsets:

Communication
Trash-talking
Bothersome Language
Disruptive Voice

Game Behavior
Overly Aggressive
Unsporting Conduct
Quit Early

Playing Skill
Lacking Skill
Too Good
Unfamiliar With Game

My understanding is that avoiding a player for skill reasons doesn’t ultimately affect their reputation, and since I consider 100 pointing to be a form of impairment, I choose to take pity on those poor impulse control deprived souls and only pick “lack of skill”. 

As for the other categories, I have very, very rarely chosen to avoid anyone for any of those. “Quit early” could just as easily be a server glitch, and I’ve very rarely experienced any mic abuse worthy of report. As for griefing (a.k.a. “unsporting conduct”), I’m so used to it, that I don’t bother hitting “avoid player” on any of them (unless you literally follow me, shoving and circling me for 30 seconds or more, then I lower the banhammer). 

"I should go look at my reputation!", I thought. Last time I checked, which was pre AssRev/AssBro domination, it was rock solid. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that, despite being 5 stars overall, and with a 71% approval rating, 29% of the people I’ve played with have chosen to avoid me. Ouch! As for why, well, Xbox only shows you the two criteria in question: Communication, and Game Behavior. Apparently, 50% of the players avoiding me reported me for "trash talking" and the other half for "unsporting conduct", but all of this is highly, highly suspect. First of all, I’ve never griefed anyone in my life, however, as I mentioned above, I am usually griefed, at least once a session, whenever I play. I don’t even use the "taunt" button half as much as I should (once every few games, if that). Second of all, despite wanting to (in some of my weaker moments, of course), I have never, ever had my mic on publicly. Never.

Which brings me to an important question… How do they know??? See, I am THE WORST trash talker ever. Seriously. The things that come from this mouth would make a dockhand blush. It’s not pretty, but it’s a hobby I share with some of my friends. We get into a party, join a match, and then unleash a foul torrent of unspeakable, if not downright anatomically impossible profanity. Racism? Bad. Sexism and homophobia? Bad. But no orifice is spared by our putrid stream of colorful filth. Thing is, what happens in party chat, stays in party chat. I would never tolerate that from any player that is not my friend, and I would be absolutely mortified if any stranger playing against me were to overhear it. 

This whole affair has made me so paranoid that I even had to confirm with Xbox support to make sure that there’s no way my party chat can be overheard. It also took me to the internet at large, where again and again I saw complaints about the system being useless, since it allows sore losers to downvote players for fictional bad behavior, hurting their overall reputation score. Even the direct response from Xbox linked above implies that the reputation system is ripe for abuse. In fact, most of what I saw online indicated that the better you are at the games you play online, the more likely you are to receive negative feedback. Given that I’ve been on a merciless streak of kills and stuns, perhaps some people have gotten sick of seeing me at the top of their session leaderboard.

All this to say, haters gonna hate, and… I finally made it?

The dog I’m looking after overheard me complaining about all the bitches griefing me in AssRev. Then I come home, and find this.
Previous photos starring this dog can be found here and here.

The dog I’m looking after overheard me complaining about all the bitches griefing me in AssRev. Then I come home, and find this.

Previous photos starring this dog can be found here and here.

From my Twitter feed: Reasons the new XBL update is heinous.

1) all my games are now represented itty bitty namby pamby little icons, floating in a sea of empty grey space? ugly. #xbla @xbox

2) there is more cheesy stock photography of happy @xbox users than there is relevant personalized content. #xbla [NOTE: this seems to have gotten better once I signed in]

3) the achievement display is horrid. in fact, the entire avatar/user section is poorly conceived, & feels like an afterthought. #xbla @xbox

4) the windowpane navigation suuucks when you’re using a controller. i guess that was the point? #headscratch #xbla @xbox

5) the #xbla social panel only shows ONE friend online at a time? what’s the point? all or nothing, @xbox.

6) especially in the marketplace, having each window scream colors and info and prices and stuff is garish and offputting. #xbla @xbox

… and here’s my video, on my XBLA dash. WTF.

… and here’s my video, on my XBLA dash. WTF.

So Xbox has created a nerdy little corner of the Xbox Live world where you can interactively compare your gaming stats to other Xbox Live members around the world. It’s available to Xbox Live Rewards Gold members, which so far seems to be working out nicely for me… (I’ve been given a free month of XBL Gold for being one of the first 10,000 Canadian members to sign up for Xbox Live Rewards).
See that huge single player spike? According to the data, I spent 1389 minutes gaming that day or 23.15 hours… given the time period, I would assume that’s when I was elbow deep in Dragon Age: Origins… but almost a full day? Something’s not right.

So Xbox has created a nerdy little corner of the Xbox Live world where you can interactively compare your gaming stats to other Xbox Live members around the world. It’s available to Xbox Live Rewards Gold members, which so far seems to be working out nicely for me… (I’ve been given a free month of XBL Gold for being one of the first 10,000 Canadian members to sign up for Xbox Live Rewards).

See that huge single player spike? According to the data, I spent 1389 minutes gaming that day or 23.15 hours… given the time period, I would assume that’s when I was elbow deep in Dragon Age: Origins… but almost a full day? Something’s not right.

via gamingconsolenetwork.com
hey kids, the 1 vs. 100 live season finale on xbox live is tonight, so if any of you nerds wanna join in the fun here’s how to do it:
option 1) meet us virtually online at quarter to 10 (no latecomers, we wanna be in the room by 10pm sharp)
or
option 2) drop by number 9 to shout the answers out live in our living room. tonight’s drink special is mulled apple soda with whiskey.
see you there!

via gamingconsolenetwork.com

hey kids, the 1 vs. 100 live season finale on xbox live is tonight, so if any of you nerds wanna join in the fun here’s how to do it:

option 1) meet us virtually online at quarter to 10 (no latecomers, we wanna be in the room by 10pm sharp)

or

option 2) drop by number 9 to shout the answers out live in our living room. tonight’s drink special is mulled apple soda with whiskey.

see you there!